FYI, people. Tickets will go fast.
bigredandshiny:

We are thrilled to announce the third annual BIG RED SHINDIG, our annual fundraiser and celebration of two years since our relaunch. Again with generous support from our friends at the Boston Center for the Arts, Panopticon Imaging, and from our new friends at Samuel Adams, Pretty Things Brewery, Foodie’s Markets, and Custom Eyes we’re inviting you to another raucous evening of great art, music, and dancing at the Boston Center for the Arts’ Mills Gallery on Friday, September 5 from 7-10pm. Libations are on us, with beer provided by Samuel Adams and Pretty Things for those 21+. Tickets are $20, which can be purchased online by going to bigredandshiny.com/tickets. We have a limited number on offer, so purchase tickets early while you can!This year we’re excited to showcase work by Sean Downey, Giovanni Giacoia, and Emma Rhodes, with Liz Nofziger’s BCA Public Art Residency project “Bounce,” an interactive outdoor installation in the courtyard in front of the venue, with more to be announced in the coming weeks.Music stylings will be provided by DJ Flak, DJ DayGlow, DJ Pace.Big Red & Shiny is a volunteer-run nonprofit organization that relies on donations to operate. We strive to support Boston’s diverse art communities, institutions, and writers through coverage and criticism, and believe that any creative endeavor, no matter how big or small, should be seen and discussed by our audience. To that end, we are committed to providing free access to all of the writing that we publish online without paywalls. Your $20 ticket purchase will help to ensure that we are able to continue our mission by funding BR&S for another year.

FYI, people. Tickets will go fast.

bigredandshiny:

We are thrilled to announce the third annual BIG RED SHINDIG, our annual fundraiser and celebration of two years since our relaunch. Again with generous support from our friends at the Boston Center for the Arts, Panopticon Imaging, and from our new friends at Samuel Adams, Pretty Things Brewery, Foodie’s Markets, and Custom Eyes we’re inviting you to another raucous evening of great art, music, and dancing at the Boston Center for the Arts’ Mills Gallery on Friday, September 5 from 7-10pm. Libations are on us, with beer provided by Samuel Adams and Pretty Things for those 21+. Tickets are $20, which can be purchased online by going to bigredandshiny.com/tickets. We have a limited number on offer, so purchase tickets early while you can!

This year we’re excited to showcase work by Sean Downey, Giovanni Giacoia, and Emma Rhodes, with Liz Nofziger’s BCA Public Art Residency project “Bounce,” an interactive outdoor installation in the courtyard in front of the venue, with more to be announced in the coming weeks.

Music stylings will be provided by DJ Flak, DJ DayGlow, DJ Pace.

Big Red & Shiny is a volunteer-run nonprofit organization that relies on donations to operate. We strive to support Boston’s diverse art communities, institutions, and writers through coverage and criticism, and believe that any creative endeavor, no matter how big or small, should be seen and discussed by our audience. To that end, we are committed to providing free access to all of the writing that we publish online without paywalls. Your $20 ticket purchase will help to ensure that we are able to continue our mission by funding BR&S for another year.

The quintessential @NeilTyson tweet

pourmecoffee:

Holland Cotter asks (& answers) why such a diverse city has an art world that’s “a bastion of whiteness”

In his piece “Lost in the Gallery-Industrial Complex,” New York Times art critic Holland Cotter asks:

And on the subject of integration, why, in one of the most ethnically diverse cities, does the art world continue to be a bastion of whiteness? Why are African-American curators and administrators, and especially directors, all but absent from our big museums? Why are there still so few black — and Latino, and Asian-American — critics and editors?

And the answer, in part, lies here:

Political art brings me back to where I started, with artists, and one final, baffled complaint, this one about art schools, which seem, in their present form, designed to accommodate the general art economy and its competitive, caste-system values. Programs are increasingly specialized, jamming students into ever narrower and flakier disciplinary tracks. Tuitions are prodigious, leaving artists indentured to creditors for years.

The art world loves to skewer institutions supposedly at the top of the art world ecosystem, such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, for putting on shows bereft of diversity, but we can look elsewhere, too. Cotter devotes much of his article to the art market and New York City’s cost of living - he says each has their effect on the art created here, but we can look further down the food chain. We can’t ignore (although we often do) the privilege that enables an individual to have the choice to become an art student in an economically inequitable society like our own. Cotter’s use of the term “caste-system” is apt.

amalgammaray:

The pair of carved fruitwood model eyes with lens and iris are contained in lacquered-brass gimbal mounts on tapered columns mounted on a display base, 1870. Designed by the Dutch Ophthalmologist Franciscus Donders (1818-1889).

Eyeball models, 1870.

(Source: zeusammon)

The resort dog at Mataking Island: Though it looks like she’s enjoying the view, she’s actually protecting the sea turtle hatchery from hungry monitor lizards that swim from the mainland.

The resort dog at Mataking Island: Though it looks like she’s enjoying the view, she’s actually protecting the sea turtle hatchery from hungry monitor lizards that swim from the mainland.

We didn’t have time for formal holiday greetings this year, but hopefully you’ll enjoy last year’s card (illustrated by Alyssa Holland Short) with a slight modification by the artist/filmmaker Matthew Nash.

We didn’t have time for formal holiday greetings this year, but hopefully you’ll enjoy last year’s card (illustrated by Alyssa Holland Short) with a slight modification by the artist/filmmaker Matthew Nash.

spacesuitsyou:

scanning the spaceSpace Men (Assignment: Outer Space)1960, Antonio Margheriti, Italy

Another star map? (From Space Men (Assignment Outer Space) Italy, 1960)

spacesuitsyou:

scanning the space
Space Men (Assignment: Outer Space)
1960, Antonio Margheriti, Italy

Another star map? (From Space Men (Assignment Outer Space) Italy, 1960)

leradr:

Sumerian star map from Ninive
3000 b.C.

leradr:

Sumerian star map from Ninive

3000 b.C.

new-aesthetic:

"Border Check (BC) is a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the internet’s infrastructure while you surf the web. It will show you through which countries and networks you surf to illustrate the physical and political realities of the internet’s infrastructure. using free software tools."
http://www.bordercheck.org/
Border Check, the physical and political realities behind the internet - we make money not art

"a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the Internet"

new-aesthetic:

"Border Check (BC) is a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the internet’s infrastructure while you surf the web. It will show you through which countries and networks you surf to illustrate the physical and political realities of the internet’s infrastructure. using free software tools."

http://www.bordercheck.org/

Border Check, the physical and political realities behind the internet - we make money not art

"a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the Internet"

npr:

Last night’s chalkboard gag on The Simpsons, in memory of Marcia Wallace.  ATC Tribute. (mp3)

Last night’s “chalkboard gag” on The Simpsons was a memorial to Marcia Wallace.

npr:

Last night’s chalkboard gag on The Simpsons, in memory of Marcia Wallace.  ATC Tribute. (mp3)

Last night’s “chalkboard gag” on The Simpsons was a memorial to Marcia Wallace.